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Making the Transition to Running Your Own Firm

In operating a professional practice as a private business, a licensed design professional faces many risks. A prudent design professional entering private practice should consider insurance to cover certain exposures, including professional liability, cyber liability, commercial general liability, commercial auto coverage, and the risk of property loss. In addition, practitioners should be sure they have adequate personal coverage–for their own life, health, and retirement needs. As firms grow, they may consider providing benefits to staff, such as health insurance, life & disability insurance, and retirement plans, among others. In addition, firms must consider how to manage these benefit plans. Sole proprietors should consider acquiring insurance to protect themselves and their families from injury or financial harm.




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